Tag: joseph john lee

Michael Roberti’s Best Reads of 2023

Wow. 2023 was a year and a half.  This was a year when I finally felt like I could get back to reading after two years spent mostly writing, and boy, the books brought it. Then, Kavin brought me on to post my reviews, and I’ve been amazed by the continuous love of the Silverstones and online book communities. I’m sitting here drinking coffee listening to Dr. Dre’s classic The Chronic 2001, and I just want to get into it.  So, let’s go! Ok, pause, actually. I want to shout out two books that stood head and shoulders above the...

Continue Reading →

The Bleeding Stone by Joseph John Lee

Summary The island nation of Ferranda is the jewel of the Acrarian Kingdom, and its Founder, Aritz a Mata, is revered as a god amongst men. But twenty-five years ago, Aritz was merely a man, a colonizer, an Invader seeking glory and fame in the name of his King and Queen, and Ferranda was a nameless union of indigenous Tribes, reverent of the heightened powers and aptitudes granted to them by their Animal Deities, but sundered by the foreigners claiming their lands to the south. In the unconquered north, the Stone Tribe has for fifteen years offered a safe haven...

Continue Reading →

SFINCS Review: Pale Night Red Fields by Joseph John Lee

Summary The threads of fate are not so easily unwoven. There is a growing fascination among the Dusk Tribe with the land of the dead. The Tribe's shamans work tirelessly day and night to find a path to communion with their people's lost souls, but answers are slow to uncover. As both the son of a shaman and the Tribe's only Futureseer, Zarrow is ordered to view the days and weeks ahead to reveal the source of the Tribe's successful discovery, but when he does so, he finds not celebration, but destruction. Devastation. Sacrifice. And those closest to him bloodied...

Continue Reading →

The Bleeding Stone by Joseph John Lee

Summary The island nation of Ferranda is the jewel of the Acrarian Kingdom, and its Founder, Aritz a Mata, is revered as a god amongst men. But twenty-five years ago, Aritz was merely a man, a colonizer, an Invader seeking glory and fame in the name of his King and Queen, and Ferranda was a nameless union of indigenous Tribes, reverent of the heightened powers and aptitudes granted to them by their Animal Deities, but sundered by the foreigners claiming their lands to the south. In the unconquered north, the Stone Tribe has for fifteen years offered a safe haven...

Continue Reading →